Keyword: governance

Why bother to vote?

Many South Africans may be pondering this question, as we interrogate the political events of the past week, wondering whether these were in the public's best interests. Why Democracy taps into the debate about the power of the individual voter, putting the question, "Why bother to vote?", to a wide range of thinkers and public figures. The debate captures the views of those both in favour and against voting, highlighting interesting food for thought.

Infighting in the ANC: An Alternative Perspective

Picture credit: chinadaily.com Democracy Now - South African poet and activist, Dennis Brutus, is interviewed by Amy Goodman of Democracy Now, a television and radio news program, pioneering the largest community media collaboration in the United States and airing on over 700 stations. AMY GOODMAN: In South Africa, the deputy leader of the African National Congress has been chosen to serve as interim president following the resignation of Thabo Mbeki. Mbeki resigned Sunday over allegations of interference in a corruption...

Where to From Here? Zimbabwean Migrants and the Future of Southern Africa

Picture credit: blog.foreignpolicy.com Loren Landau & Tara Polzer - With Robert Mugabe begrudgingly accommodating Morgan Tsvangirai and Arthur Mutambara at the bridge of Zimbabwe’s sinking ship, there is at last hope that the once proud country will soon find its way to calmer waters.  Although anxious of snags ahead, no one is more relieved than the millions of Zimbabweans both in and outside the country who have suffered through more than eight years of violence, persecution, and economic tragic-comedy. Cheering almost as loud are...

Zimbabwe: A Future for Political Stability?

Hara Mutasa from Al Jazeera talks to ordinary Zimbabweans about their reaction to the power-sharing deal struck between Zanu-PF and the MDC. Zimbabweans are relieved about the peace between rival political parties, but remain cautiously optimistic about the future.

Bolivia: Can the Majority of People Vote for Change and Actually Get It?

Picture credit: miss mass Mark Weisbrot - Evo Morales changed the history of Bolivia when he was elected in December 2005 as the country's first indigenous president, and the first to get a majority of 54 percent. On August 10, he expanded his mandate considerably in a referendum, with 67 percent of voters opting to keep him in office. The conventional wisdom in Washington -- where the foreign policy establishment is decidedly not sympathetic to Morales' populist agenda -- has been that the referendum would settle nothing. Bolivia...

Recall Vote Divides Bolivia

Picture credit: Alain Bachellier Benjamin Dangl - In early July in Sicaya, Cochabamba, Bolivian President Evo Morales announced that if he wins the August 10 recall vote on his presidency, "I'll have two and half years left." But if he loses the vote, "I'll have to go back to the Chapare" to farm coca again. Though the recall vote is likely to favor Morales, it's unclear if it will resolve many of the divided nation's conflicts. This upcoming recall vote on the president, vice president and eight of nine departmental...